Posted in arc, Diversity

LGBT+ book review

TRANS/gressive

Riki Wilchins

Riverdale Avenue Books

Publication date 1st June 2017

 

The Truth About Goodbye

Russell Ricard

Wise Ink Creative Publications

Publication Date 1st April 2016

 

 

Please note that both books were given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

TRANS/gressive is a history.   TRANS/gressive is a retelling.   It is a history of a movement.  It is a history of people growing into political consciousness.   It is a history of an individual’s journey through that movement; their role within it, their view of it, and their doubts about a movement that they had helped to build.

 

This book outlines the changes within the Trans community. How trans individuals went from; shame to anger, from anger to empowerment, and from empowerment to the roots of victory. It is the story of how these individuals took on the entrenched views of the feminist movement and the violence of the wider community.  It is a story of how the politicised trans community; lobbied, protested, set up camps, held vigils, and found community. It is the story of how they began to win victories.   It is the story of division and struggle.  It is the story of the disagreements that emerged in victory.  This book is a good introduction to a newly emerging movement.     It is a good place to start if you want to gain an understanding of how a marginalised group; grew into political awareness, found solidarity, began to fight political campaigns, began to win victories, and changed our world.  It is written in a very accessible manner.   It is a must read for all who wish to understand; the birth of a movement that is shaping our world and how individuals become politicised.

 

The Truth About Goodbye (Russel Riccard) maybe seen as a child of the wider LGBT+ campaign.  On the surface, this book looks like your average romantic novel.   It is written in the clear almost filmic, dialogue driven, manner of such works. The story line follows a traditional form.  An individual loses their partner, must come to terms with their loss, and eventually move onto another relationship.  But, the similarity ends there.   The central character is a male grieving another male.  The book asks, how a person can truly grieve in a society that sanctions, neither; the persons relationship or the individual’s grief.   In addition, it is an interesting portrait of a man coming to terms with the aging process and the social limitations that come with that process. This book is for you if you are in the market for a,  diversity driven, summer beach read.

 

 

Posted in arc, Diversity, literature, reviews, world fiction

​Ida By Alison Evans

I was given this by by the publisher in exchange for an honest review

Ida is a normal, unmotivated, individual who can time travel or that is what she believes.  She is in a relationship with a non binary artist.  She lives with her father and autistic relative and has no idea what to do with her life.  All she knows is that she can jump around in time. At first, she only uses that power in emergencies. But, then it becomes addictive. Then, Ida loses control of her powers,  having no control concerning when she jumps. The places where she lands get more surreal and frightening with each jump. Soon she discovers that there is more to her power than meets the eye. 
In many ways this book is nothing to write home about. It is a conventionally written speculative fiction work. However,  this book has a diverse range of characters and that is its major selling point. Both the autistic and non binary characters are fairly well drawn.  This book would make a great option for those wishing for a diverse YA/ spec read. 

Posted in Austrian women writers challenge, Diversity, Fantasy, Galactic suburbia, New weird fiction, reading challenge

Australian women writers- debris

Book/s  Debris

Author/s Jo Anderton

Publisher Angry Robot

Date September 27th 2011

Why I read this book? I read this as part of the Australian women’s writing challenge.  In addition, the fact that it was published by Angry Robots books made it more tempting.  I had also heard good things about this book from galactic suburbia.

Summary This book, the first of a series, portrays a world of two sectors. The first sector, the more advanced community, belongs to people who can see, and control, the colourful pions that power the city; while, the second sector, a pre-technological grimy ghetto, is inhabited by the ‘Debris’ collectors.  These Debris Collectors cannot see the pions and therefore are forced to collect the pions’ Debris and they are seen/treated as ‘untouchables’ by the rest of society.   Tanyana, the main POV character, quite literary falls from the first half of the world to the second.  This book explores her journey and her adaption to the new world.  She finds that the future of the world relies upon her finding the truth and fighting an emerging evil that threatens her society.

Conclusion

Jo Anderton has created a brilliant world and peopled it with interesting characters.  She, very cleverly, gives the reader a tempting glance of the pion driven world before cruelly snatching it away. The reader therefore shares the main characters sense of loss and uncertainty as this bright world is stripped away.  Debris is a wonderfully unsettling read.  I am looking forward to the next in the series suited.

Posted in Diversity, Epic Fantasy, Fantasy, Modernisation, NK Jemisin

The Kingdom of Gods by N.K. Jemisin My rating: 5 of 5 stars