Posted in Uncategorized

Man Booker 2017 Long List 

The 2017 longlist: 

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (US) (Faber & Faber)
Days Without End by Sebastian Barry (Ireland) (Faber & Faber)
History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (US) (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)
Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan-UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
Solar Bones by Mike McCormack (Ireland) (Canongate)
Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor (UK) (4th Estate)
Elmet by Fiona Mozley (UK) (JM Originals)
The Ministry Of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy (India) (Hamish Hamilton)
Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (US) (Bloomsbury Publishing)
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie (UK-Pakistan) (Bloomsbury Circus)
Autumn by Ali Smith (UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
Swing Time by Zadie Smith (UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (US) fleet 

I have read Solar Bones and Lincoln in the Bardo. It will be interesting to re-read and review these brilliant books. I have copies of underground railroad and Exit West on on TBR shelf. So, this would be a great time to read them. I have been meaning to read Autumn and swing time for some time. So, this will be a great excuse to read them.  The other books on the List sound interesting. So, despite my intention not to read the list, it looks like I’m going for a Booker read again. How about you are you going to read the List this year? Is it a good list? Or do you think there are too many well known names.

Posted in arc, Diversity

LGBT+ book review

TRANS/gressive

Riki Wilchins

Riverdale Avenue Books

Publication date 1st June 2017

 

The Truth About Goodbye

Russell Ricard

Wise Ink Creative Publications

Publication Date 1st April 2016

 

 

Please note that both books were given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

TRANS/gressive is a history.   TRANS/gressive is a retelling.   It is a history of a movement.  It is a history of people growing into political consciousness.   It is a history of an individual’s journey through that movement; their role within it, their view of it, and their doubts about a movement that they had helped to build.

 

This book outlines the changes within the Trans community. How trans individuals went from; shame to anger, from anger to empowerment, and from empowerment to the roots of victory. It is the story of how these individuals took on the entrenched views of the feminist movement and the violence of the wider community.  It is a story of how the politicised trans community; lobbied, protested, set up camps, held vigils, and found community. It is the story of how they began to win victories.   It is the story of division and struggle.  It is the story of the disagreements that emerged in victory.  This book is a good introduction to a newly emerging movement.     It is a good place to start if you want to gain an understanding of how a marginalised group; grew into political awareness, found solidarity, began to fight political campaigns, began to win victories, and changed our world.  It is written in a very accessible manner.   It is a must read for all who wish to understand; the birth of a movement that is shaping our world and how individuals become politicised.

 

The Truth About Goodbye (Russel Riccard) maybe seen as a child of the wider LGBT+ campaign.  On the surface, this book looks like your average romantic novel.   It is written in the clear almost filmic, dialogue driven, manner of such works. The story line follows a traditional form.  An individual loses their partner, must come to terms with their loss, and eventually move onto another relationship.  But, the similarity ends there.   The central character is a male grieving another male.  The book asks, how a person can truly grieve in a society that sanctions, neither; the persons relationship or the individual’s grief.   In addition, it is an interesting portrait of a man coming to terms with the aging process and the social limitations that come with that process. This book is for you if you are in the market for a,  diversity driven, summer beach read.