Posted in awards, i science fiction

Locus Online: 2012 All-Centuries Polls Results

Locus Online: 2012 All-Centuries Polls Results

The via Locus Online: 2012 All-Centuries Polls Results (for novels) is out.  All I can say is that disappointingly  to be expected.  Question,  where are the women;  it seems like only Le Guin, Rowling, Willis,  McCaffrey and Bujold get a mention.  What would you have included?

20th and 21st All-Centuries Polls Results

21 December 2012:

In November 2012 Locus Online hosted a poll for the best novels and short fiction of the 20th and 21st centuries, with five categories in each century: SF novel, fantasy novel, novella, novelette, and short story. For 20th century categories, up to 10 votes in each category were allowed; for 21st century categories, 5 items in each were allowed. Results depend on rank of votes within each category, using algorithms that reward a 1st place vote twice as many points as a 5th or 10th place vote, but not 5 times or 10 times as many.

A total of 625 valid ballots were received, three-quarters of them in the last four days of November.

Since all votes were write-in, the task of compiling results was more arduous than it is for the annual Locus Polls. As of today only results in the novel categories have been completed, and are as follows. An * indicates a tie.

20th Century SF Novel:

Rank

Author : Title (Year)

Points

Votes

1

Herbert, Frank : Dune (1965)

3930

256

2

Card, Orson Scott : Ender’s Game (1985)

2235

154

3

Asimov, Isaac : The Foundation Trilogy (1953)

2054

143

4

Simmons, Dan : Hyperion (1989)

1836

131

5

Le Guin, Ursula K. : The Left Hand of Darkness (1969)

1750

120

6

Adams, Douglas : The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979)

1631

113

7

Orwell, George : Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

1493

105

8

Gibson, William : Neuromancer (1984)

1384

100

9

Bester, Alfred : The Stars My Destination (1957)

1311

91

10

Bradbury, Ray : Fahrenheit 451 (1953)

1275

91

11

Heinlein, Robert A. : Stranger in a Strange Land (1961)

1121

75

12

Heinlein, Robert A. : The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (1966)

1107

76

13

Haldeman, Joe : The Forever War (1974)

1090

82

14

Clarke, Arthur C. : Childhood’s End (1953)

987

70

15

Niven, Larry : Ringworld (1970)

955

74

16

Le Guin, Ursula K. : The Dispossessed (1974)

907

62

17

Bradbury, Ray : The Martian Chronicles (1950)

902

63

18

Stephenson, Neal : Snow Crash (1992)

779

60

19

Miller, Walter M. , Jr. : A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959)

776

56

20

Pohl, Frederik : Gateway (1977)

759

58

21

Heinlein, Robert A. : Starship Troopers (1959)

744

53

22

Dick, Philip K. : The Man in the High Castle (1962)

728

54

23

Zelazny, Roger : Lord of Light (1967)

727

50

24

Wolfe, Gene : The Book of the New Sun (1983)

703

43

25

Lem, Stanislaw : Solaris (1970)

638

47

26

Dick, Philip K. : Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968)

632

47

27

Vinge, Vernor : A Fire Upon The Deep (1992)

620

48

28

Clarke, Arthur C. : Rendezvous with Rama (1973)

588

44

29

Huxley, Aldous : Brave New World (1932)

581

42

30

Clarke, Arthur C. : 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

569

39

31

Vonnegut, Kurt : Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)

543

39

32

Strugatsky, Arkady & Boris : Roadside Picnic (1972)

518

36

33

Card, Orson Scott : Speaker for the Dead (1986)

448

31

34

Brunner, John : Stand on Zanzibar (1968)

443

33

35

Robinson, Kim Stanley : Red Mars (1992)

441

35

36

Niven, Larry (& Pournelle, Jerry) : The Mote in God’s Eye (1974)

437

32

37

Willis, Connie : Doomsday Book (1992)

433

33

38

Atwood, Margaret : The Handmaid’s Tale (1985)

422

32

39

Sturgeon, Theodore : More Than Human (1953)

408

29

40

Simak, Clifford D. : City (1952)

401

28

41

Brin, David : Startide Rising (1983)

393

29

42

Asimov, Isaac : Foundation (1950)

360

24

43

Farmer, Philip Jose : To Your Scattered Bodies Go (1971)

356

25

44

Dick, Philip K. : Ubik (1969)

355

25

45

Vonnegut, Kurt : Cat’s Cradle (1963)

318

24

46

Vinge, Vernor : A Deepness in the Sky (1999)

315

22

47

Simak, Clifford D. : Way Station (1963)

308

24

48

Wyndham, John : The Day of the Triffids (1951)

302

24

49*

Keyes, Daniel : Flowers for Algernon (1966)

297

23

49*

Delany, Samuel R. : Dhalgren (1975)

297

19

20th Century Fantasy Novel:

Rank

Author : Title (Year)

Points

Votes

1

Tolkien, J. R. R. : The Lord of the Rings (1955)

5675

340

2

Martin, George R. R. : A Game of Thrones (1996)

2182

149

3

Tolkien, J. R. R. : The Hobbit (1937)

2040

138

4

Le Guin, Ursula K. : A Wizard of Earthsea (1968)

1613

113

5

Zelazny, Roger : Nine Princes in Amber (1970)

971

70

6

Lewis, C. S. : The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

821

58

7

Mieville, China : Perdido Street Station (2000)

757

54

8

Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (1997)

657

49

9

Crowley, John : Little, Big (1981)

645

41

10

Adams, Richard : Watership Down (1972)

632

46

11

Goldman, William : The Princess Bride (1973)

604

46

12

Martin, George R. R. : A Storm of Swords (2000)

602

43

13

Beagle, Peter S. : The Last Unicorn (1968)

597

45

14

White, T. H. : The Once and Future King (1958)

589

46

15

Pratchett, Terry (& Gaiman, Neil) : Good Omens (1990)

523

38

16

Kay, Guy Gavriel : Tigana (1990)

522

38

17

Gaiman, Neil : Neverwhere (1996)

509

38

18

Wolfe, Gene : The Book of the New Sun (1983)

494

35

19

Vance, Jack : The Dying Earth (1950)

457

31

20

Bulgakov, Mikhail : The Master and Margarita (1967)

442

29

21

Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000)

440

33

22

Tolkien, J. R. R. : The Silmarillion (1977)

433

32

23

Leiber, Fritz : The Swords of Lankhmar (1968)

425

30

24

Jordan, Robert : The Eye of the World (1990)

423

29

25

Donaldson, Stephen R. : Lord Foul’s Bane (1977)

416

32

26

Bradbury, Ray : Something Wicked This Way Comes (1962)

411

30

27

Peake, Mervyn : Gormenghast (1950)

410

29

28

Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999)

406

32

29

Powers, Tim : The Anubis Gates (1983)

403

29

30

Martin, George R. R. : A Clash of Kings (1998)

381

26

31

Bradley, Marion Zimmer : The Mists of Avalon (1983)

368

28

32

Hobb, Robin : Assassin’s Apprentice (1995)

367

27

33

Pratchett, Terry : The Colour of Magic (1983)

359

27

34

Holdstock, Robert : Mythago Wood (1984)

326

25

35

King, Stephen : The Stand (1978)

316

22

36*

L’Engle, Madeleine : A Wrinkle in Time (1962)

310

23

36*

Pratchett, Terry : Small Gods (1992)

310

23

38

Ende, Michael : The Neverending Story (1983)

291

23

39

Peake, Mervyn : Titus Groan (1946)

287

20

40

Howard, Robert E. : Conan the Barbarian (1950)

283

20

41

McCaffrey, Anne : Dragonflight (1968)

281

22

42

Orwell : George : Animal Farm (1945)

279

20

43

Feist, Raymond E. : Magician (1982)

274

21

44

Silverberg, Robert : Lord Valentine’s Castle (1980)

261

20

45

Lovecraft, H. P. : At the Mountains of Madness (1936)

249

20

46

Swanwick, Michael : The Iron Dragon’s Daughter (1993)

247

18

47

King, Stephen : The Shining (1977)

238

18

48

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel : One Hundred Years of Solitude (1970)

223

16

49

Saint-Exupery, Antoine de : The Little Prince (1943)

217

16

50

Hughart, Barry : Bridge of Birds (1984)

213

16

21st Century SF Novel:

Rank

Author : Title (Year)

Points

Votes

1

Scalzi, John : Old Man’s War (2005)

674

101

2

Stephenson, Neal : Anathem (2008)

432

63

3

Bacigalupi, Paolo : The Windup Girl (2009)

367

58

4

Wilson, Robert Charles : Spin (2005)

305

49

5

Watts, Peter : Blindsight (2006)

251

37

6

Morgan, Richard : Altered Carbon (2002)

238

37

7

Collins, Suzanne : The Hunger Games (2008)

199

32

8

Gibson, William : Pattern Recognition (2003)

197

30

9

Mieville, China : The City & the City (2009)

193

29

10

Stross, Charles : Accelerando (2005)

187

31

11

Mitchell, David : Cloud Atlas (2004)

185

30

12

McDonald, Ian : River of Gods (2004)

181

29

13

McCarthy, Cormac : The Road (2006)

151

23

14

Harrison, M. John : Light (2002)

147

22

15*

Willis, Connie : Black Out/All Clear (2010)

142

20

15*

Chabon, Michael : The Yiddish Policemen’s Union (2007)

142

23

21st Century Fantasy Novel:

Rank

Author : Title (Year)

Points

Votes

1

Gaiman, Neil : American Gods (2001)

721

109

2

Clarke, Susanna : Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004)

609

94

3

Rothfuss, Patrick : The Name of the Wind (2007)

422

64

4

Mieville, China : The Scar (2002)

221

33

5

Martin, George R. R. : A Feast for Crows (2005)

213

34

6

Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007)

211

33

7

Bujold, Lois McMaster : The Curse of Chalion (2001)

177

27

8

Mieville, China : The City & the City (2009)

170

28

9

Fforde, Jasper : The Eyre Affair (2001)

160

27

10*

Bujold, Lois McMaster : Paladin of Souls (2003)

150

22

10*

Pratchett, Terry : Night Watch (2002)

150

26

12

Gaiman, Neil : Coraline (2002)

144

24

13

Wolfe, Gene : The Wizard Knight (2004)

141

23

14

Pratchett, Terry : Going Postal (2004)

137

23

15*

Gaiman, Neil : The Graveyard Book (2008)

136

22

15*

Lynch, Scott : The Lies of Locke Lamora (2006)

136

23

Posted in advance copy, BRENDAN CONNELL, LIVES OF NOTORIOUS COOKS

cooking up a a good story or two or three

LIVES OF NOTORIOUS COOKS

 

BY BRENDAN CONNELL

 

Press release

[Connell] is a master of language, an endlessly inventive wordsmith who writes with a poets eye and vision…”

 

            —Peter Tennant, Black Static

 

Connell is a stunningly good writer.


Robert Butterfield, Dead Reckonings

 

Connell is nothing if not inventive, diverse and sublimely witty.

            —The Agony Column

 

 

Description

 

When he reached the age of 767, Peng Zu was sought after by the benevolent Emperor Yao, who wished to receive advice on ruling the nation. Peng Zu made a thick soup for the emperor out of pheasant, Jobs tear seeds and plums, well salted. Eating the dish, the emperor felt as if he were sitting on air. He was filled with a deep cosmic joy in which he saw everything clearly.

You see, Peng Zu said, the gravest problems of state can be resolved over a bowl of soup. The people, seeing you live frugally will not resent you. When the ruler is calm, the nation is calm.

Learn of the outrageous and sometimes dubious lives of Peng Zu and fifty other notorious cooks from the pages of history and legend, in a picaresque dictionary of delicious and playful story-telling.

 

About the Author

Brendan Connell was born in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1970. He has had fiction published in numerous places, including McSweeneys, Adbusters, and the World Fantasy Award winning anthologies Leviathan 3 (The Ministry of Whimsy 2002), and Strange Tales (Tartarus Press 2003). His published books are: The Translation of Father Torturo (Prime Books, 2005), Dr. Black and the Guerrillia (Grafitisk Press, 2005), Metrophilias (Better Non Sequitur, 2010), Unpleasant Tales(Eibonvale Press, 2010), The Life of Polycrates and Other Stories for Antiquated Children (Chômu Press, 2011), and The Architect (PS Publishing, 2012).

 

Publication Info

 

Paperback, 180 pages

Chomu Press
1st edition, December 5th, 2012
ISBN:
 978-1-907681-20-2

USA: $12.00

UK: £10.00

Europe: 10.50

 

Contact

 

Kasia Duzy: pr@chomupress.com

www.chomupress.com

 

 

 

 

(The author kindly gave me an advance peep at  this work. However, my review will remain as independent as possible. )

 

The book is mosaic in nature, telling the unconnected stories of several notorious cooks. It has a large geographic reach, spanning from England to China and all points in between. In addition, it covers a great chunk of time. The stories include both mundane and fantastic elements.  Therefor,  this book could have been written for me.

The idea is a good one. Many of the stories are simultaneously; funny,touching and eccentric. However, after several of them, they begin to merge and the reader’s attention begins to wander.

This would be a good bedside/handbag book. You could read a random story when time allows. However,  I wouldn’t recommend reading them one after the other.  Take  time to savor, and digest, each meal before moving on to the next. This would make a good Christmas present for a foodie.

Posted in Uncategorized

Kirstyn McDermott

Perfections by Kirstyn McDermottThis is what’s called being late to your own party. And it’s not the kind of fashionable tardiness where you saunter down a curving staircase all coiffed and primped and wearing a trailing ball gown while your friends and loved ones graciously applaud and start singing Happy Birthday. It’s more the embarrassing oh-my-goodness-I-forgot-about-my-own-damn-party-where-the-hell-are-my-shoes sort of lateness. Not that I forgot, precisely, more that I was still picking myself up off the ground after being repeatedly run over by the Freight Train of the Gods that has been 2012.

Ahem.

So thank you to Sean Wright and Tansy Rayner Roberts and Jason Nahrung and all the other people who have already blogged, tweeted and facebooked the news that, yes indeed, I have a brand spanking new novel hot off the digital press and available right this minute. Her name is Perfections and I’m very proud and pleased with how she’s…

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Posted in Fantasy, library thing

Library thing review

The Chosen (Portals of Destiny #1)

by Shay WestShay Fabbro .

I was given this book as part of Library Things’ early reviewer scheme.  But, as you can see, I’ve been honest in my review.

A threat is on the horizon and many worlds are in peril; their future lying in the hands of a group of chosen individuals, currently scattered amongst the various worlds. Unaware of their future, these individuals are being schooled, and protected, by a group of alien beings. These beings await the signs that will herald the opening of a series of portals.

This is a multi-world saga.   One world resembles a high fantasy biosphere full of inns and busty maidens.. Terra is portrayed as a dystopia; a world that has returned to its early, non-technical roots. The third  world has a futuristic feel; being set in a sterile space which is peopled by clones. The  variety and diversity of  the  worlds enabled the writer to cross genres. In addition, it gives the work, superficially an adventure tale, another interesting dimension.

For a tale of this type, the characters are surprisingly well drawn. Although, you may feel that you’ve seen many of them before; the wise pipe smoking sage, the silly lovelorn teenager, the wise boy who is yet to find his power, the cynical warrior/priest who learns to love the world which he once despised, the evil queen, etc., etc.

In fact, that queen is my main cause of concern. Firstly, she seems to be a stereotypical character. In addition, her royal town, and its back story, trouble me .  We are told that this group of women had thrown off the shackles of patriarchy and formed a Matriarchal society.  The town is portrayed as a  tyranny, having a lustful queen at its head.  We have seen this before. Captain Kirk, or some other male Starfleet captain, lands on a planet and finds that it is headed by a woman.  The world seems to be peopled by semi- clad women.  It always turns into a tyranny.  It always has to be saved by men. It’s a cliché and it’s slightly demeaning to half of the world’s inhabitants. This work sets up an interesting world and begins to ask the question- what would a female headed world look like?  But, rather than giving us a nuanced picture, the writer returns to the tropes of bad science fiction.

This  genre crossing book could have been an exciting, boundary crossing and thought-provoking work. But, the writer never pushes hard enough. The author asks interesting questions but answers them with stereotypes and tropes.  But, saying that, if you want a good adventure story, and have a few empty hours,  then this book is for you.